News round: packaging design abroad | Double design

The editorial staff of Packaging Management scans foreign packaging sites every week for news and developments. This week we noticed the design messages below from The Die Line, World Brand Design, Design Week, Behance and BP&O.

happy eggs

Mantiqueira Brasil presents a range of eggs from free-range chickens under the Happy Eggs brand. A brand that focuses solely on the quality of animal welfare.
The essence of Happy Eggs is cheerful, free and light. The freedom of the chicken is clearly expressed in its organic and pure form. His charisma and spontaneity are reflected in the smile and character that come alive in different expressions of the language.
The illustrations and patterns are inspired by pop language, with a lot of movement and energy. The color palette has vibrant and cheerful shades that relate to each of the products in the line. And the robust, round style reflects the charisma of communication.
Source: Behance

Mantiqueira Brasil presents a range of eggs from free-range chickens under the Happy Eggs brand.

Barbecue time with Miller Lite’s charcoal

For many people, a backyard barbecue and a cold beer are the perfect summer combination. Reason enough for Miller Lite to launch its own charcoal. “Miller Time” becomes “Griller Time”, or vice versa.
Miller Lite’s Beercoal is made from charcoal with added Miller Lite beer. Once fried, the unique charcoal disperses the flavor of Miller Lite in what you grill through a deliciously smoked layer of beer, the brewer said.
Where most charcoal packaging looks dull, Miller Lite packaging looks refreshing. The brand used the lite beer packaging elements over the white bag, with the ‘Lite’ logo on top and the familiar brand logo at the bottom. The only significant difference is the burnt charcoal, which sits in the middle of the label and highlights the effect of the product inside.
The 2kg packs of Miller Lite Beercoal went on sale in the US at the end of last month and were quickly sold out. Maybe a lucrative idea for Dutch breweries to market a similar promotional product now that the World Cup is only taking place at the end of this year?
Source: The Die Line

Miller Lite markets its own charcoal.

Stylish candle packaging

Alejandro Gavancho gave the Lost Saints candle a new design with a crafty look. The previous packaging was visually appealing, but lacked a working graphics system to help distinguish one product from another. The designer devised a packaging with a kind of fuse as a closure. It gives the packaging a stronger link to the candles and creates an exciting unboxing experience.
Each flavor is assigned a color to make it easier to distinguish one product from another. Furthermore, the agency created a unique logo that exudes elegance and class that matches the brand name. As a detail, an image has been created in which the isotype is radiated by 45 halo lines, representing not only the light coming from the flame, but also the total number of hours each light burns.
Source: World Brand Design

Alejandro Gavancho gave the Lost Saints candle a new design with a crafty look.

Border Biscuits completely renewed

B&B studio has made the restyling of Border Biscuits. Bold colors, new logo and font replace the more traditional style from the previous branding.
The reorganization, which Border Biscuits says is the biggest step in its 38-year history, coincides with the launch of a new series. The design elements are rolled out across all products and assortments.
Accessibility and clarity are key elements in the rebrand, which according to the design studio will be visible in an updated, bolder logo. B&B adds that the underlined and ‘elevated o’ in the logo is designed to reflect the quality of the product.
Source: DesignWeek

Old (left) and new packaging from Border.

Double design

Stockholm Design Lab has designed the Swedish craft brewer Omaka’s beer packaging. The assembly of bottles and cans consists of a repeatable structure of two complementary halves. This is where the central brand idea (‘omaka’ = odd) is developed, which combines graphic clarity with the changeable and unexpected that brewer Hedda Spendrup’s beer possesses.
The lower section contains modern art performances. Bold artistic expression meets mass production with a practical top section, where essential information is organized in neat lines of text. There is a consistent style that is in harmony with the imbalance and freedom of the artwork below.
The individual effect of the individual beers (with names like ‘Mamma’, ‘Aphrodite’ and ‘A1’) is secondary to the appearance of the entire range.
Source: BP&O

Stockholm Design Lab has designed the Swedish craft brewer Omaka’s beer packaging.

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